Is it healthy to become a VEGAN?

to become a VEGAN? 

A vegan diet is a type of vegetarian diet based on vegetables, grains, nuts and fruits. Vegans do not consume dairy products or eggs. According to the American Dietetic Association, well-planned vegan and other types of vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of life, including during pregnancy and lactation.

Veganism has become increasingly popular in recent years, and many vegans insist that their health and overall quality of life has improved since eliminating meat and animal products from their diets. Some research suggests that vegetarians and vegans tend to be thinner than meat-eaters [2]. Vegans may also have lower levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, which contributes to a lower risk of heart disease and stroke.

However, switching to a vegan diet is not as simple as deciding what you want to eat and then having your meals come out of a box or your garden. Many potential vegans experience difficulty in obtaining all the nutrients they need from their new diet, particularly those nutrients found almost exclusively in animal products such as the lower risk of heart disease and stroke.

However, switching to a vegan diet is not as simple as deciding what you want to eat and then having your meals come out of a box or your garden. Many potential vegans experience difficulty in obtaining all the nutrients they need from their new diet, particularly those nutrients found almost exclusively in animal products such as vitamin B12, vitamin D and calcium.

To help ensure they are meeting their nutritional needs, most vegans include good sources of these three nutrients in their diets or take supplements. Vegans should also consider the following:

Vegans can meet protein needs with soy products like tofu (soybean curd), tempeh (vitamin B12, vitamin D and calcium. To help ensure they are meeting their nutritional needs, most vegans include good sources of these three nutrients in their diets or take supplements. Vegans should also consider the following:

Although dietary supplements are not always needed or recommended, vegans can take supplements of vitamin D if they don’t get adequate exposure to sunlight.

Vegans should also consider avoiding foods that contain high levels of phytoestrogens (plant estrogens) like soy and needs for this nutrient, as it’s found only in animal products.

Although dietary supplements are not always needed or recommended, vegans can take supplements of vitamin D if they don’t get adequate exposure to sunlight. Although dietary supplements are not always needed or recommended, vegans can take supplements of vitamin D if they don’t get adequate exposure to sunlight.

Are Vegans more susceptible to getting cancer?

The link between vegetarianism and a lower risk of cancer has been observed in several studies. The American Cancer Society reports that people that don’t eat red or processed meats are about 10 to 15% less likely to develop colorectal cancer.

Excluding meat and dairy products from your diet is not easy. Many people find it difficult to give up common foods like chicken, beef or cheese, especially if they do so abruptly. Studies of vegan diets have found that the longer you follow the diet, the more likely you are to eat fewer animal products. This suggests that adopting a vegan diet for ethical reasons may provide long-term benefits like lower cholesterol levels and reduced risk of heart disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes.

 

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